This Day in History – September 27th

September 27th
The opening procession of the Stockton and Darlington Railway crosses the Skerne bridge

Today is Thursday, Sept. 27, the 270th day of 2018. There are 95 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On September 27th, 1825, the Stockton and Darlington Railway, the world’s first public railway to use steam locomotives was officially opened with passengers finding a seat in the specially kitted out coal wagons that were used for hauling coal from the mines to boats

On this date:

In 1540, Pope Paul III issued a papal bull establishing the Society of Jesus, or Jesuits, as a religious order.

In 1779, John Adams was named by Congress to negotiate the Revolutionary War’s peace terms with Britain.

In 1854, the first great disaster involving an Atlantic Ocean passenger vessel occurred when the steamship SS Arctic sank off Newfoundland; of the more than 400 people on board, only 86 survived.

1942, Glenn Miller and his Orchestra performed together for the last time, at the Central Theater in Passaic, New Jersey, prior to Miller’s entry into the Army.

In 1939, Warsaw, Poland, surrendered after weeks of resistance to invading forces from Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union during World War II.

In 1943, Bing Crosby, the Andrews Sisters and the Vic Schoen Orchestra recorded “Pistol Packin’ Mama” and “Jingle Bells” for Decca Records.

In 1954, “Tonight!” hosted by Steve Allen, made its network debut on NBC-TV.

In 1962, “Silent Spring,” Rachel Carson’s study on the effects of pesticides on the environment, was published in book form by Houghton Mifflin.

In 1986, the Beatles song “Twist and Shout” re-entered the pop charts after it was featured in the movies “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off” and “Back to School.” It eventually rose to number 23.

In 1991, President George H.W. Bush announced in a nationally broadcast address that he was eliminating all U.S. battlefield nuclear weapons, and called on the Soviet Union to match the gesture.