This Day in History – October 1st

October 1st

Today is Monday, Oct. 1, the 274th day of 2018. There are 91 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On Oct. 1, 1908, Henry Ford introduced his Model T automobile to the market. Ford’s new auto was offered to the public at a relatively economical $825, and buyers could choose any color Model T as long as it was black. Offering a four-cylinder engine, around 20 mpg, and a top speed of 40 mph, the Detroit automaker marketed his car to America’s burgeoning middle class.

On this date:

In 1890, Congress passed the McKinley Tariff Act, which raised tariffs to a record level.

In 1910, the offices of the Los Angeles Times were destroyed by a bomb explosion and fire; 21 Times employees were killed.

In 1949, a 42-day strike by the United Steelworkers of America began over the issue of retirement benefits.

In 1957, the motto “In God We Trust” began appearing on U.S. paper currency.

In 1964, the Free Speech Movement began at the University of California, Berkeley. Japan’s first high-speed “bullet train,” the Tokaido Shinkansen, went into operation between Tokyo and Osaka.

In 1971, Walt Disney World opened near Orlando, Florida.

In 1982, Sony began selling the first commercial compact disc player, the CDP-101, in Japan.

In 1987, eight people were killed when an earthquake measuring magnitude 5.9 struck the Los Angeles area.

In 1994, National Hockey League team owners began a 103-day lockout of their players.

In 1996, a federal grand jury indicted Unabomber suspect Theodore Kaczynski in the 1994 mail bomb slaying of advertising executive Thomas Mosser. (Kaczynski was later sentenced to four life terms plus 30 years.) The federal minimum wage rose 50 cents to four dollars, 75 cents an hour.

Thought for Today: “It is not easy to find happiness in ourselves, and it is not possible to find it elsewhere.” — Agnes Repplier (REHP’-leer), American essayist (1858-1950).