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KPYN NEWS FOR Tuesday, July 25, 2017

SAN ANTONIO (AP) — Federal prosecutors say a 60-year-old man will be charged Monday after more than 100 people were packed inside a sweltering tractor-trailer in Texas, and nine of them died. Nearly 20 others have been hospitalized in dire condition, many with extreme dehydration and heatstroke. Authorities warn the death toll could rise. San Antonio Police are calling it a human-trafficking crime. Acting ICE Director Thomas Homan says authorities are looking for “many more people” to prosecute.

CHICAGO (AP) — It could take months for investigators to determine how and why a scheme to smuggle dozens of Mexicans into the United States ended with the death of nine people who were in an overheated tractor-trailer discovered in Texas. But previous cases where smugglers used such trucks to move human cargo shed light on this method of human trafficking _ and how it can go badly wrong. The most notorious case occurred in 2003, when 19 being smuggled in a truck in south Texas died of heat-related injuries.

UNDATED (AP) — Experts say the temperature inside a tractor-trailer where nine smuggled immigrants died and many others were left in dire health would have quickly become unbearable in the Texas heat. Jan Null, a meteorology professor at San Jose State University, says that with a high of 101 degrees (38 Celsius) in San Antonio on Saturday, the temperature inside of a parked car would have reached 120 degrees (49 Celsius) in 10 minutes. Within 20 minutes, it would have risen to 130 degrees (54 Celsius).

DALLAS (AP) — Activists frustrated by the state of the roads in cities such as Dallas, New York, San Francisco and Boston are taking a do-it-yourself approach to improving them. Groups of anonymous Twitter users have been establishing makeshift bike lanes and filling in potholes in their communities, unbeknownst to their city governments. Though the measures are meant to be temporary, they say they can show the public what could be and spur cities to make permanent improvements.